“Why I’m Not Voting This Election”

George Yancey recently posted an article on Patheos explaining why he won’t be voting in the midterm elections. He ends his post with “No waiting in long lines for me to vote this year. I have better things to do with my time. I am staying home.”

Unfortunately, no, staying home to boycott the American system we currently have in place is not a better way to spend your time. Even voting third party or write-in is a better option than simply staying home.

As I’ve argued before, boycotting the voting process is, for various reasons (both practical and philosophical), simply not an option in my mind. Although it’s about the 2016 presidential election, I would urge you to read this article, as I think there are a lot of basic principles there that apply to the midterm elections as well. In that article, I explain the Christian’s basic responsibility to live as good citizens in the country in which we reside and to seek the welfare of that country, how that relates to our duty to be involved in the voting process, what “voting your conscience” does and does not mean, and why being consistent carries implications for even where we shop! I encourage you to take the time to read the whole post with an open mind. But, for the bottom liners, here’s my conclusion:

We must, both as faithful Christians and good citizens, vote for the candidate whose policies will most effectively preserve the welfare of the nation, protect innocent life, punish evil, and provide for a tranquil and quiet life for us and our neighbor. — “On Citizenship, Voting, and Starbucks”


Postscript: It’s tempting—especially for Christians—to have the mindset that says “I don’t really care who wins this election; it ultimately doesn’t matter.” I think this is misguided, as it fails to sufficiently take into account our duty to love our neighbor, and falls prey to the error of being “so heavenly-minded that we’re of no earthly good.” But that’s a point for another post.

PPS: In my opinion, state and local elections are actually, in many ways, more significant than national elections, and it’s becoming quite perturbing to hear so many folks preoccupied with the national stage who have no idea who their own governor, mayor, or sheriff is. I imagine as the social justice mayhem swells, we will see a shift in that regard.

 

 

 


If you’ve benefited from resources like this one, would you be willing to support our efforts to create and curate solid resources and help us deliver more regular content? Please consider giving a one-time donation through PayPal with this link, or become a regular supporter through Patreon with this link and get access to even more content each month!
Advertisements
Posted in Cultural Commentary, Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Learning to be non-androgynous men…

Most Christians—including, unfortunately, many complementarians—speak of men and women as though they are basically interchangeable in every way except with regard to specific formal offices in the church and home. We often act like humans have largely androgynous souls that just happen to get stuffed into gendered bodies. The problems and dangers of that view are myriad, and it comes out in the way pastors and Christian leaders give advice to men—advice that really would be equally as relevant to women.

Where is the gender-specific, real-world, biblical and practical wisdom for men to learn how to cultivate godly masculinity? Where is the biblical doctrine of the household? Where is the fatherly advice that makes men want to be good at being men? Allow me to reiterate a few places to start.

First, I can’t recommend highly enough the project from Michael Foster and Bnonn Tennant called “It’s Good to Be a Man.” Right now, it’s only a Facebook page, but they’re hoping to gain some momentum and start a site to post articles and continue helping men any way they can. I’d love to see them start a podcast. Anyway, even though it’s only a Facebook page right now, I’m telling you these guys are worth following—helpful and real. Set it so that you get notifications everytime they post, and enjoy!

Here’s some more to get you off the ground:

Recommendations for some books, blogs, and podcasts men ought to know about.

Recommendations of some specific men worth following. This is how you really learn and grow—by following men who are already being the kind of men you want to be.

 

 

 

 


If you’ve benefited from resources like this one, would you be willing to support our efforts to create and curate solid resources and help us deliver more regular content? Please consider giving a one-time donation through PayPal with this link, or become a regular supporter through Patreon with this link and get access to even more content each month!
Posted in Manhood/Family | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Two More on Social Justice

Two more issues in the whole matter (I mentioned before another crucial distinction) are the definition of justice and the direction of obligation. The definition of justice is not what progressives would have us make it, and this is crucial in understanding the whole conversation. Justice is rendering to each person that which he is due. It’s unjust to murder you because you have a God-given right to life, for lack of a better term (“rights” has been grossly misunderstood and misused of late). You can’t appropriate my iPhone without my permission, because it’s mine, and I have a right to my own property. But do I have a judicial obligation to send $20 to a village in Africa to help provide them with clean water? Well, no; but it would be kind. That’s not justice, that’s charity. The social justice movement has so conflated the two that when they speak of “justice,” they almost unswervingly are referring to a matter of charity, or of skewed equity, but rarely matters of actual justice and injustice.

By “direction of obligation,” I simply mean that to argue that caring for the poor is not a matter of justice in the strictest sense, is not to say that we have no obligation in that area, only that our obligation is not to man, but to God as someone who calls on us to have compassion.

This article explains well the necessary distinction between justice and charity, or, to use another biblical word, between justice and grace. This, in fact, has serious implications for our understanding of the gospel itself, and that’s exactly why this distinction is so imperative.

Giving your money to the poor is not justice; it’s mercy. Taking other people’s money by force (whether through the government or any other means) and giving it to the poor is neither justice nor mercy; it’s injustice.

The folks at Cripplegate have made this crucial distinction before, and they say it again in this article critiquing those who claim that the SJ&G Statement is opposing the poor, with an excellent point about the validity of a “preach the gospel” approach to social change.

Tim Keller is one of the primary leaders of Christian social justice compromise, even though he seems to be oblivious to the fact that he’s one of the men the SJ&G Statement is specifically addressing. He recently responded to a question about his opinion on the statement. He danced around for a few minutes spewing nonsense, and this critique of his comments is well worth reading through.

Here are a few other articles of note:

Races Don’t Reconcile, Hearts Do

Does the Bible Require Wealth Redistribution and Equalization?

The Theological Problem with Tim Keller’s So-Called Social Justice


 

If you’ve benefited from resources like this one, would you be willing to support our research and help us deliver more regular content? Please consider giving a one-time donation through PayPal with this link, or become a regular supporter through Patreon with this link and get access to more content each month!
Posted in Cultural Commentary | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My Philosophy Summarized

If I were to try to summarize my socio-political philosophy at the level of first principles in one (long) sentence, it would look something like this. I’ll probably have to return to this with a few more posts to unpack it practically, but here it is at the highest level.

I believe that neither individual nor society can long maintain a peaceful and quiet life—which ought to be the aspiration and pursuit of all men (1 Thess. 4:11-12; 2 Thess. 3:12; 1 Tim. 2:2)—without seeking to cultivate, within both themselves and others, wisdom and virtue, which are inextricably tied to and derivative of a firm belief in absolute, transcendent standards of truth, goodness, and beauty.

Posted in Cultural Commentary | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Tyranny of Pop

My favorite living philosopher, Roger Scruton, has a fascinating piece on the potentially corrosive nature of pop music. Listen to it (with an open and humble mind) below. His description of background music is particularly delightful.

Then check out this series from Religious Affections on the importance of distinguishing between high, folk, and pop culture. I’m not principally opposed to people listening to pop music or anything like that; but these are important and helpful distinctions to make, and we must not be mindless and undiscerning in our consumption of pop culture.

 

 

Posted in Cultural Commentary | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blogmatics—On Confessions of Faith

Blogmatics (i.e. what we at Ancient Paths believe)

You can find my own articulation of our beliefs in this post. But, the title of this blog being Ancient Paths, I thought it appropriate to also point to some of the old historic confessions that accurately represent the doctrinal beliefs we hold. So then…

Ancient Creeds

Though I take some exception with the specific wording here and there, I think the creeds have tremendously valuable formulations that, sadly, have been forgotten and ignored in much of modern Christianity. And, for that reason, we no longer have any moors by which to define historic Christian orthodoxy.

Confessions of Faith

I come from a tradition that typically has some rather considerable disdain for confessionalism. This is unfortunate for various reasons, and not necessarily characteristic of the older tradition of which I am a beneficiary. I wouldn’t necessarily call myself confessional, simply because of some of the connotations that term now carries. However, I think the historic confessions are indispensable to a robust understanding of theology, and I would consider myself to be more or less in line with these four confessions.

Some Modern Declarations

Again, with some minor differences in preferred wording, I have found the following declarations on specific topics (and two modern confessions) to be of considerable public value, and of tremendous personal benefit as well.

Extra Reading

I’ve found these confessions to be particularly helpful in their wording, for the most part, but unfortunately have some significant disagreements with the views expressed in one or more places.

  • Helwys’ Confession (1611) (with the exception of article 7 on falling from grace; but I especially appreciate his wording on election in article 5; particularly relevant to our day is article 16 on the appropriate size of a congregation—as Voddie would say, if you can’t say amen, you ought to say ouch)
  • The Standard Confession (1660) (a helpful Baptist confession, but my discomfort lies primarily in articles 12 and 14)
  • The Orthodox Creed (1679) (This is an important confession, but it’s problematic when it comes to the Adamic Covenant, and thus the active obedience of Christ)
  • A Short Confession or a Brief Narrative of Faith (1691) (This confession has some unfortunate wording concerning original sin and justification. Despite this, the sections on the extent of Christ’s death, providence, and election, are especially helpful)
  • New Hampshire Confession (1833) (This is a well-written Particular Baptist confession based loosely on the 1689; I disagree with their wording on Perseverance, and the Christian Sabbath, but the majority of the confession is solid)

For the Uncomfortable and/or Curious

If the idea of subscribing to historic confessions is new to you, you may find these articles from Founders Ministries helpful. Of course, Founders subscribes to the 1689 Second London Confession, which I disagree with at various points; however, their arguments and explanations are still valid and a very valuable introduction to the importance of utilizing the creeds and confessions.

 


If you’ve benefited from resources like this one, would you be willing to support our research and help us deliver more regular content? Please consider giving a one-time donation through PayPal with this link, or become a regular supporter through Patreon with this link and get access to more content each month!

 

Posted in Doctrinal Statements, Theology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment