Emotional Decisions

In Ecclesiastes 5:2, King Solomon says,

“Do not be rash with your mouth, and do not let your heart be quick to utter a word before God. For God is in heaven, and you are on earth; so let your words be few.”

And in verse four, he says,

“When you make a vow to God, do not delay in fulfilling it, for He takes no pleasure in fools. Fulfill what you vow! It is better that you not vow than that you vow and not fulfill it.”

In other words, we should not be making extremely gravitous decisions quickly, lightheartedly, or under the stress and excitement of emotions. Don’t commit yourself to doing something before God, out of the excitement of emotion. Sometimes people get so excited about something, and worked up in passion, that they declare that they will do some great thing for God.

Often, this happens in the form of committing their lives to the mission field, when they really haven’t even thought through it that much. That scenario happened a couple of times in chapel when I was in college. There were a bunch of missionaries there and they were preaching on the necessity of world missions for every individual Christian, saying “you better be planning to go, but willing to stay!” Which I don’t agree with anyway, because I don’t think that God calls every individual to go to China, India, Haiti or Chad. But they would get the students all on fire for world missions, and then they would have some emotionally impactful music playing for a while, and then give an invitation to anyone who felt they were being called to devote their lives to overseas missions — and hundreds of students went forward.

But even just the simple, small, evangelical church service can run the risk of catering to people’s emotions to the point that they are prepared to say or do something rash, under the pretense that it is truly out of a deep-seated love and respect for God. But this is so, so dangerous, because emotion only has the content of what has already been put in. Gene Cunningham used to say that emotion had no content. And when I was in Israel with him a couple of years ago, he mentioned that he used to say that, and then he said that that’s not right. Actually, emotion has content; the problem is that if you haven’t been putting good, doctrinally sound, spiritual truth in, then what comes out is not going to be based on the truth — it’s just going to be coming out of our sinful nature.

I always think of this illustration: If I’m carrying a glass of water, and you bump into me, what spills out of the glass? Water. If I’m carrying a glass of coke, what spills out? Coke! Because what spills out, is whatever has been put in. And as we go about our lives, when we bump into each other, or when something comes into our life that causes our emotions to spill out, whatever spills out is whatever has been put in.

So what must we do? We need to be putting the right content in constantly, so that when it spills out, what comes out of our hearts is truth. How do we get this? Pour over the Scriptures. We need to be striving for a closer walk with God. It’s only through His Word that we can grow in our knowledge of God. And it’s through His Word that we learn how to worship Him in spirit and truth.

Advertisements

About Tweed Tavern

We exist to exhort passionate followers of Christ to think more deeply about their faith, and to challenge deep thinkers to become more passionate followers of Christ. Throughout history, taverns have provided a venue for theological and political debate. Hoping to honor that tradition, welcome to the Tavern!
This entry was posted in Christianity Today and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s