The Role of Jesus’ Miracles

Thought for the day… Jesus’ miracles did not prove He was God.

Jesus performed countless miracles during his ministry (John 21:25), but the four gospels only record between 35 and 40 of those miracles.

It is common for people to think that Jesus’ miracles proved He was God. But plenty of other people did miracles as well. It is important to note that the miracles that Jesus performed did not prove that He was God. Rather, they proved He was an authorized spokesman of God (John 3:2) and that what He said should be listened to – and thus, His claims regarding Himself (that he was the Messiah, the Son of the Living God) must be accepted (John 2:11; John 4; John 7:31; John 20:31).

The Old Testament is clear that if someone is an authenticated spokesman of God, his message is to be heard and obeyed (Deut. 13:1-5; Deut. 18:21-22). Many did respond to Jesus in this way (John 2:23; John 11:45). However, there were also those who rejected Jesus’ claims. The Pharisees and Sadducees saw all the signs and miracles Jesus performed, and yet still rejected Him. In Matthew 12, Jesus tells the Pharisees of the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit when they reject Jesus’ miracles and their witness to the truth of His message. Instead of accepting His claims regarding who He was, the Pharisees claimed that He performed these miracles not by the power of God, but by the power of Satan. Later, in John 11, the Sanhedrin even convened in order to decide what to do about Jesus “since this man does many signs.” What they should have done was accept His claims about Himself and bow in worship. But instead, they decided to kill Him, because they did not want more people to believe in Him. The book of John is written so that we might believe Jesus is the Messiah, and God Himself, so that if we believe Him, He might become our Savior (John 20:31).

The question is, who do you say Jesus is?

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About Tweed Tavern

We exist to exhort passionate followers of Christ to think more deeply about their faith, and to challenge deep thinkers to become more passionate followers of Christ. Throughout history, taverns have provided a venue for theological and political debate. Hoping to honor that tradition, welcome to the Tavern!
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